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Winning Smile 2

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Winning Smile 1

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Tacking Dental Phobia

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Facial Rejuvenation

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Family fortunes

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A winning smile

I commonly see a bad approach to teeth and oral hygiene. Ignoring unhealthy teeth will make the situation much worse and can cause unnecessary pain and aggravation in the future; not mentioning the difference healthy teeth makes to the face and overall confidence. My passion is to combine preventative dentistry with cosmetic dentistry and facial aesthetics, forming A harmonious fusion with these elements to achieve a healthy, beautiful smile.

The importance of oral hygiene is a point repeated by dental professionals everywhere, and for good reason. A healthy mouth has been well documented to play an important role in one’s overall wellbeing. The mouth mirrors the health of the body – if the mouth is healthy, chances are that the rest of the body is in good health as well.

Dental disease can interfere with eating, speaking, normal daily activities and self-esteem. It is an important factor in social situations, and an unhealthy mouth can impinge on confidence and affect both work and personal relationships.

Nothing will replace your original teeth, so it is vital that you maintain them. The long term effects of unhealthy teeth are not only the health ramifications, but also the aesthetic. I believe that it is counter-intuitive to focus only on the aesthetic side, when it is the teeth that are the cause of the problem. As such i endeavour to look for a long term solution rather than a short term fix, and often find that the answer is to first focus on improving the general dental health of a person, and then look to cosmetic treatments at a later stage.

Maintaining a good standard of oral hygiene is simple, and it is as much your responsibility as it is your dentist’s. Brush twice a day, whilst remembering the spaces between your teeth are as important as the teeth themselves. If you miss these spaces you are missing around 40 per cent of your teeth, and neglecting them can cause bad breath, a bad taste and an accumulation of bacteria leading to serious problems in the future. An interdental brush for the spaces between the back of your teeth, and floss for the front is ideal for avoiding these problems.

It is important to visit your dentist often. Go to your dentist every six months for a check-up and an oral health screen. This is an opportune time to be assessed for early signs of dental issues. Early intervention is always advised to prevent more intensive treatments in the future. Cracks in fillings, unhealthy gums, tooth wear and disease can often be corrected with minimal treatment if detected early enough. You can be certain that ignoring these problems will entail complicated and costly procedures to rectify them.

It is important to consider that healthy teeth and good oral hygiene can often deliver the same results as facial cosmetics. The priority is always that clients are, and look healthy. Correction of dental problems can give a more aesthetic appearance, but sometimes dental treatments are not enough to give the appearance that one may be interested in. It may be that a combination of cosmetic dentistry and facial aesthetics is also necessary.

When addressing aesthetics the whole face must be considered, not just the teeth. That is why i am passionate about delivering every option available to provide a long term solution to both dental health and facial aesthetics. This ranges from simple advice to complex smile makeovers and facial muscle relaxants.

There may come a time in a person’s life where for whatever reason they would like to increase their confidence, and boost their ego through cosmetic dental treatments. My philosophy is to give that person the results they are looking for, using a method that promotes preventative dentistry as its foundation. We all only have one set of teeth, and despite the many alternatives it is so important that they are well kept. Be it for health reasons, confidence or beauty, small adjustments can make the world of difference.

“everyone will notice, but no one will know.”

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Tackling dental phobia

Nobody necessarily likes going to the dentist, but for some people, just the Thought of an upcoming dental visit can trigger many mixed unpleasant Feelings such as anxiety and sleeplessness. These people are commonly known To suffer from dental phobia, which is generally the term used to define a Fear of dentists and dental work.

 

Deriving from the greek word ‘phóbos’, the term Translates to mean an extreme or irrational fear Of, or aversion to something. This kind of fear is Often exaggerated and disabling, and the sufferer Will try to avoid it by any means possible.

According to the british dental association, Around 25% of the british population suffers from some sort of anxiety before visiting the dentist, And around 12% of us suffer from extreme dental Anxiety and fear.

Dental phobia comes in many forms, but to name A few, there’s the fear of the needle, fear of the pain associated with treatment, fear of the drill, Fear of feeling powerless and/or fear of choking.

Patients can experience one or more of these Feelings and in many cases, this leads to the client missing their appointment or becoming severely distressed during their visit. Sometimes, Intense fear may make it near impossible for the Dentist to fulfill the treatment.

However, where do these phobias originate from? There is no solid answer here, as these feelings vary from person to person, but for many patients It’s often related to a previous bad experience.

While some patients have not had bad Experiences themselves, they may of heard horror stories from others. Many patients nowadays are Using internet-based message boards, blogs and social networking sites to keep in touch, which ultimately can lead to false rumours surrounding certain treatments.

Also, parents who themselves are very frightened of certain treatments, can enforce that fear on their children when bringing them in for checkups or treatments.

So how do you overcome these problems? Every Dentist has their own way of treating patients, But our theory is that faultless communication And preparation is vital when treating patients With dental phobia.

The patient should tell their dentist exactly how They feel and what fears they have. If they’ve had a bad experience previously, they need to be More specific and relay which aspect of the treatment they found most difficult. The dentist Must listen thoroughly and do their best to try to avoid and overcome those problems, in order to Put the patient at ease.

We will always do our utmost to explain the Treatment systematically; this includes what is going to happen and what instruments and Materials we are going to use. We also make Sure that the patient has the option to stop the Treatment at any time.

After the initial consultation, a patient’s comfort In the dental chair is a very important factor. Many patients like to listen to music to drown out the Sound of the dental drill. In some surgeries there are even tv screens placed on the ceiling as a Means to distract their mind.

Most importantly, a patient with dental phobia Should have frequent checkups to avoid extended treatments such as root canal or extractions.

It is very important to find a dentist that you can Build a good relationship with and whom you can trust.

With today’s vast improvements in technology, There are alternative techniques to be used such as the wand (pain-free injection), laser dentistry, Air abrasion, and digital impressions.

However, while these may be applicable in some Cases, they certainly will not replace the dental drill or local anesthetic needle every time. Therefore, in the long term, tackling the phobia Itself is by far the best option.